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  1. GRIM

    Ronda Rousey’s Face Next ??

    Nope! but Amanda Nunes announced it for her
    2 Points
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  4. LMWBXR

    Ronda Rousey - not striking coach??

    That is the truth. Maybe If i want to be the champ it's time to go shopping lmao.
    1 Points
  5. The asshole part seemed like a possibility at the beginning of the fight.. but then after Davis fought and won , he seemed pretty humble with the victory. This was a great fight. I love the power punching
    1 Points
  6. Incredible performance
    1 Points
  7. Mofo2

    Ronda Rousey - not striking coach??

    Definitely seems so, this has to be one of the most brutalfalls from grace in combat sport in the last few years that I can remember tbh
    1 Points
  8. selij

    Schedule Week 03 (Jan 19th - 25 Jan)

    WEEK 03 Thursday January 19th 2017 Palladium, Worcester, Massachussetts, USA Irvin Gonzalez vs. Oscar Eduardo Quezada, 6 rounds, junior lightweights Ray Graceski vs. Ralph Johnson, 6 rounds, light heavyweights Ranse Andino vs. Jonathan Perez, 4 rounds, junior lightweights Chuck Shearns vs. Shavonote Dixon, 4 rounds, junior middleweights Felix Martinez vs. Brian Richardson, 4 rounds, heavyweights Richard Rivera vs. Huston Crayton, 4 rounds, light heavyweights Wilfredo Pagan vs. Alexander Picot, 4 rounds, welterweights Luis Santiago vs. Jonathan Ramos, 4 rounds, junior featherweights Anthony Laureano vs. Rafael Francis, 4 rounds, junior welterweights Brandon Montella vs. Roberto Valenzuela, 4 rounds, light heavyweights Jean Pierre Augstin vs. TBA, 4 rounds, heavyweights ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Friday January 20th 2017 Bally's Event Center, Atlantic City, N.J., USA (Showtime USA) Adam Lopez vs. Danny Roman, 12 rounds, WBA junior featherweight eliminator Ronald Ellis vs. Christopher Brooker, 8 rounds, super middleweights Kenneth Sims Jr. vs. Emmanuel Robles, 8 rounds, junior welterweights Stephon Young vs. Elton Dharry, 8 rounds, junior featherweights LeRoy Davila vs. Anthony Taylor, 6 rounds, bantamweights Keenan Smith vs. Marquis Hawthorne, 6 rounds, welterweights Anthony Young vs. James Robinson, 6 rounds, welterweights Darmani Rock vs. Solomon Maye, 6 rounds, heavyweights Hafiz Montgomery vs. Tracey Johnson, 4 rounds, cruiserweight Jeff Lentz vs. Jeff Souffrant, 4 rounds, welterweights ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Friday January 20th 2017 Grand Casino, Hinckley, Minnesota, USA (floboxing.tv) Rob Brant vs. Alex Hloros, 10 rounds, WBA-NABA middleweight title ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday January 21st 2017 At Trenton, N.J. (fighttyme.com) Zab Judah vs. Jorge Luis Munguia, 10 rounds, junior welterweights Derrick Webster vs. TBA, 8 rounds, super middleweights Mike Hilton vs. TBA, 6 rounds, cruiserweights ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday January 21st 2017 At Chicago: Achour Esho vs. Anthony Abbruzzese, 8 rounds, junior middleweights Josh Hernandez vs. TBA, 6 rounds, junior lightweights Yousif Saleh vs. TBA, 4 rounds, lightweights Ruben Schobitz vs. TBA, 4 rounds, super middleweights Jessica McCaskill vs. TBA, 4 rounds, female lightweights Francisco Saldana vs. TBA, 4 rounds, junior featherweights Javier Rivera vs. TBA, 4 rounds, flyweights ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday January 21st 2017 At Paris: Cedric Vitu vs. Isaac Real, 12 rounds, for Vitu's European junior middleweight title ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday January 21st 2017 At Jakarta, Indonesia: Tibo Monabesa vs. Rene Patilano, 12 rounds, junior flyweights ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday January 21st 2017 At Struer, Denmark: Patrick Nielsen vs. Beibi Berrocal, 10 rounds, super middleweights Dina Thorslund vs. Xenia Jorneac, 10 rounds, vacant WBC Youth female super bantamweight title Abdul Khattab vs. Arman Torosyan, 8 rounds, middleweights Mikkel Nielsen vs. Leri Tedeev, 6 rounds, junior middleweights Kim Thomsen vs. Mateusz Gatek, 4 rounds, heavyweights Stefan Haertel vs Tomasz Gargula Leon Bunn vs Przemyslaw Binienda ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sunday January 22nd 2017 Masonic Temple, Detroit, Michigan, USA Lanardo Tyner vs. Istvan Dernanecz, 8 rounds, welterweights James Gordon Smith vs. Szilveszter Ajtai, 8 rounds, bantamweights Alexey Zubov vs. Andras Csomor, 8 rounds, cruiserweights Junior Wright vs. Damon McCreary, 8 rounds, heavyweights Ja'Rico O'Quinn vs. Angel Carvajal, 4 rounds, bantamweights Larry Ventus vs. Jesus Lule, 4 rounds, welterweights Ardreal Holmes vs. Bryan Goldsby, 6 rounds, middleweights DeAndre Ware vs. TBA, 6 rounds, super middleweights Marcus Carter vs. TBA, 4 rounds, heavyweights Dewayne Zeigler vs. TBA, 4 rounds, junior lightweights
    1 Points
  9. blackrican23

    Ronda Rousey - not striking coach??

    mostly wasted time
    1 Points
  10. LMWBXR

    Ward will do what he wants to do???

    IMHO; The only people who thought otherwise were local hardcore bay are fans.
    1 Points
  11. GRIM

    Ward will do what he wants to do???

    All though his hands were raised Ward lost that fight
    1 Points
  12. I think Eubank Sr. was the one that sank the ship of the possibly 3G Eubank Jr. fight
    1 Points
  13. blackrican23

    Ronda Rousey - not striking coach??

    maybe ronda didnt buy the proper gear you should pen her a letter since your the expert on gear
    1 Points
  14. scribbs

    The Smoker

    This is longform article so may take a while and in parts regurgitates but is a quite interesting arcane bit of boxing history "In 1905, at the dawn of America’s empire under Teddy Roosevelt, a black sailor and a Jewish sailor boxed in a makeshift ring on the deck of a U.S. Navy ship. What was intended to be entertainment for hundreds of idle soldiers instead turned into a tragedy, marking a pivotal, if overlooked, moment in the history of race in the American military." https://www.buzzfeed.com/aramroston/the-lost-history-of-a-deadly-boxing-match-on-the-uss-yankee?utm_term=.bvV9LZZXJ#.wrqvgxxAX
    1 Points
  15. scribbs

    Carl Frampton eyeing 2017 weight change for 3rd Title

    Carl Frampton eyeing 2017 weight change By Joe O'Neill | on January 2, 2017 | Carl Frampton [23(14)-0] plans to cement his legacy as Ireland’s greatest ever fighter in 2017 by winning world honours at an unprecedented third weight class. ‘The Jackal’ intends to move up to super featherweight (130lbs) before the year is out and wants to add to the 122 and 126lbs titles he has already claimed. Frampton has long spoke of his desire to become a three-weight world champion, however it was always assumed that a move up to super feather was some way in the distance – potentially even his final fight. This may not be the case, with Frampton seemingly planning just two more fights at his new weight of 126lbs before moving north again. The Belfast man, who turns 30 in February, outlined in his column for the Sunday Life that he wants to defend his WBA featherweight belt against Leo Santa Cruz this month, unify with IBF champ Lee Selby at Windsor Park during the summer, then make his way up to super featherweight before Christmas. The Tiger’s Bay fighter described how “assuming I can overcome Santa Cruz and Selby, then it would be an incredible way to finish the year by moving up to fight for a third world title at super featherweight. If 2017 pans out like this then it would be the dream 12 months.” The current super featherweight champions are WBC: Francisco Vargas WBA: Jezreel Corrales IBF: Jose Pedraza WBO: Vasyl Lomachenko http://www.irish-boxing.com/carl-frampton-super-featherweight-2017/# Irish Boxing Show Podcast - Soundcloud
    1 Points
  16. Not much attention given by whom? Plenty of attention given in the Spanish networks in the United States and of course in Mexico.
    1 Points
  17. GRIM

    Weight Loss - Suana Suit

    1 Points
  18. Mofo2

    Weight Loss - Suana Suit

    Do we say SUANA in a Jamaican accent
    1 Points
  19. GRIM

    Four Stories to Follow in 2017

    Can't wait for this one, it should be heated
    1 Points
  20.  Jack Johnson is too important a historical figure to be used as a prop by right-wing politicians. By Dave Zirin There is a push underway—long championed by Republican Senator John McCain and Representative Peter King—to secure a pardon for the legendary boxer Jack Johnson, the first black heavyweight champion of the 20th century. In 1913, Johnson was convicted by an all-white jury on “Mann Act” charges—otherwise known as “white slavery”—for transporting a white sex worker named Lucille Cameron across state lines “for immoral purposes.” Even though, Johnson married Cameron several months later, the state still pushed the case until Johnson was found guilty. It was a racist conviction aimed at bringing low a fighter who was never afraid to wear expensive clothes, consort with white women, and tell mainstream America that they could kiss his ass. He was also perhaps the most powerful symbol of resistance to white supremacy since Nat Turner, inspiring spirituals and songs of protest from the fields of sharecroppers to the hard labor of chain gangs. Johnson received the maximum sentence of a year and a day in federal prison, but instead of accepting their verdict, he lived in exile for seven years. Then he eventually returned and served his sentence in Leavenworth Prison. McCain was asked by The Undefeated’s Jesse Washington about whether he believed President Obama would deny the pardon. He said, “I hope not, but I’m afraid so. I’m very confused by it. I have not understood, where this is an egregious act of racism, that the president of the United States wouldn’t want to correct history.” But the question is not whether the US government will “right this wrong” but whether Jack Johnson’s family should even allow the US to sit in judgment of this towering figure. Johnson lived a rebel’s life, and his persecution by this government is precisely part of what makes him such a powerful symbol of resistance to this day. He was both brash and uncompromising in an era when public lynchings against black men took place on weekly basis. Johnson was not an explicitly political figure like Muhammad Ali, making speeches against the Philippine American war. But as a walking, self-conscious political symbol, he explored new boundaries. Johnson was flagrantly flamboyant, described as a “dandy” by a white press shocked by a famous boxer who wanted to look good, dress fine, and not give a damn who was scandalized. From the American Legion to Booker T. Washington, they threw their punches and Johnson slipped every one like a weak left jab. Jack Johnson’s open mockery of the ceremonies of white supremacy made him more than a boxer. It made him the lightning rod of white rage and exemplar of Black Pride. This swelled to an apex on July 4 1910, when Johnson famously destroyed the “Great White Hope” Jim Jeffries in a much anticipated fight. Afterwards the New York World wrote, “That Mr. Johnson should so lightly and carelessly punch the head of Mr. Jeffries must come as a shock to every devoted believer in the supremacy of the Anglo-Saxon race.” The shock turned deadly after Jeffries was finally counted out. Violent race riots erupted around the country, in which white mobs attempted to enter black urban neighborhoods, and were repelled. After the smoke cleared, dozens of African Americans were dead in the most widespread urban cataclysm that the United States would see until the aftermath of Dr. King’s assassination in 1968. The US government did not take this moment decry racist violence, but instead turned its ire on boxing, voting to restrict films of fights and even debating the banning of boxing altogether. They also set about the relentless persecution of Jack Johnson. This led WEB DuBois to issue these immortal words about Johnson in 1914. “Why then this thrill of national disgust? It comes down, then, after all to this unforgivable blackness.” As if it wasn’t obvious enough—with Senator McCain and his history of anti-immigrant, anti-Asian racist baggage as well as Rep. Peter King, the supreme anti-Islamic bigot in Congress leading this charge—the push to pardon Jack Johnson is more about how this country wants to regard itself today than any sense of righting past wrongs. It is a bellow of the hollow conceit that racism is a disease existing primarily in the past and treats a pardon for Jack Johnson pardon as part of the “healing process” so we can move on to our post-racial future and “a more perfect union.” Pardoning Johnson in this political climate would be an act of vanity, not justice, using his story to sell a lie about the present. We are a country that just used the political tool of 18th and 19th century slaveholders—the electoral college—to elect a white supremacy sympathizer even though he received three million less votes than his opponent. This is a sick system, and it lacks the moral authority to pardon Jack Johnson for any reason other than its own public relations. It’s not for us to forgive Jack Johnson. The opposite is the case. If he were still alive, the Galveston Giant would look John McCain and Peter King square into their mottled, hypocritical faces and say, “Pardon this.” https://www.thenation.com/article/why-jack-johnsons-family-should-refuse-any-exoneration/
    1 Points
  21. GRIM

    Klitschko v.s Ward

    Naaaaa Rourke
    1 Points
  22. An interesting piece on a interesting concept and individual http://www.thesweetscience.com/feature-articles/30641-rise-fall-peoples-republic-al-haymon
    1 Points
  23. Mofo2

    Ronda Rousey Vs Amanda Nunez

    You could see against Holm that she brings nothing new to the table when she is fighting strong, technical fighters - her gameplan consists of a fast walk to her opponent, taking big shots as she walks in as she attempts to take them to the floor and there is absolutely nothing else!! She was beat before the fight even started, the mere fact that she gave minimum media coverage on the build up to the fight showed she was pretty much in a head fucked state of mind that was full of doubt!
    1 Points
  24. JoshB

    Ronda Rousey Vs Amanda Nunez

    Damn she came out trying to box again. Rhonda is slow to learn.
    1 Points
  25. blackrican23

    Weight lifting belt

    The type that pulls the labia up and tight is likely best for you
    1 Points
  26. GRIM

    Chris Eubank Jr!

    I'm thinking Eubank Jr would destroy 3G, Yeah you read it right "destroy" bring it Why do I think this you ask simple he goes hard in the ring, I was anti Chris Eubank Jr but after re watching his fights I see things different now, this guy is an animal in the ring. He might not hit as hard as the claimed 3G but he hits more often and with intensity.
    1 Points
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  29. Mofo2

    Crawford sentenced to jail

    Sounds as if he had been a little apologetic over it, the judge would have been a little easier on him!
    1 Points
  30. scribbs

    Petey Sarron

    RSR Remembers Former World Featherweight Champion Petey Sarron By Antonio Santiago-May 26, 2007 Honestly speaking, the job that I enjoy the most at RSR is writing about former or past boxers. Sadly, boxing is not like other public activities, such as music, where the name Ella Fitzgerald still holds a lot of weight, religion, where historical names are still revered and historians quoted, or politics, where Napoleon, Fulgencio Batista and Abraham Lincoln are either held as heroes or vilified to this day, decades, even centuries, after their deaths. Boxers take blows and go through great physical harm just to leave their footnote in this world, their side of the story, their vision and humanity. Great historical figures like Ernest Hemingway, Queen Elizabeth II, the Marquess of Queensbury and Frank Sinatra as well as modern legends like Sylvester Stallone and former Puerto Rican Governor Carlos Romero Barcelo are known to be staunch boxing supporters. It is interesting then, that many of the world's wealthy business people, royalty, and socialites would have the above mentioned persons visit their homes for dinner any time, yet inviting someone like, say, former world Welterweight Champion Donald Curry or multiple division Champion Johnny Tapia over for a good old time anecdote swap along with caviar and Ernest and Julio Gallo would be considered a downturn by those who can afford to do that. Because your average boxing legend, be it a champion or not, is greatly forgotten by society in general, I love to pay my humble respect to those who brought all of us joy and hope at a time with their victories by remembering them in this column. I was thinking, and I am being actually serious about this, an RSR Remembers article on Fernando Vargas. But Vargas, whose career may be done is still not officially retired. And then it hit meâ¦how about Petey Sarron? Sarron is, fairly or unfairly, mostly remembered for one night in his career, the night he lost the World Featherweight Title to Henry Armstrong, who in turn began his historic, three division titles at the same time, run that same night. But Sarron had a great career of his own, beating solid boxers like Billy Grime, Al Foreman, Benny Bass, Frankie Wallace and Baby Manuel. He even beat a guy named Babe Ruth by a ten round decision! One of the few knocks on Sarron's career, however, is that he lacked the pop to hit the home run like baseball's Babe Ruth, scoring only 25 knockouts in more than 100 bouts. Sarron made his professional boxing debut on July 1, 1925, battling to an eight round no-contest with Red Burke, as no-contests were vastly regular at that era, when many jurisdictions had not applied scoring in boxing fights yet. Before Sarron got his first world title try, he was already 78-18-11 with 13 no-contests. He lost to Freddie Miller, who had one of boxing's best rivalries with Sarron, by a fifteen round decision for the NBA Featherweight Title on March 2, 1936, at Coral Gables, Florida. In Sarron's next bout, he would again challenge Miller for the title, on May 11 of the same year in Washington, DC, with Sarron finally getting his dues paid when he conquered that NBA World Featherweight Title by out-pointing Miller over 15 rounds. After three wins, including a fine victory over Nick Camarata, Sarron made his first title defense, and he proved his mettle by getting off the canvas twice, once in round one then in round ten, to defeat tough Baby Manuel by a fifteen round decision in Dallas, Texas, on July 22. Sarron would then make South Africa his home away from home, as he had done earlier in his career with Australia, holding seven of his next nine bouts there-the other two took place in England-including a ten round non title loss to Miller and a twelve round decision over him to retain the title in a torrid, compelling affair that took place on September 4, 1937. Like two normal brothers, Sarron and Miller fought constantly, but could not be separated from each other for long. Upon return to North America, however, Sarron was welcomed by another well loved member of the fistic family, Hammering Hank, Henry Armstrong. Sarron's welcome by Armstrong was not filled with the typical presents and greetings, as Armstrong presented Sarron with a brutal array of power punches and greeted him with one of the most fearsome beatings ever witnessed in a boxing ring. What mostly nobody remembers about that fight, however, is that Sarron almost went six full rounds in a fight he clearly had no chance of winning, his deep wells of courage not allowing him to handle Armstrong the title without offering Hank a good day's work. Sarron finished his career after a points loss to Sammy Angott on July 17, 1937. He had a record of 97-24-12, 25 KO's, and 17 no-contests. In fact, he had one of the most solid chins in boxing history, his loss to Armstrong being the only knockout loss he ever suffered in 150 bouts. Among the many things people forget is the fact Sarron was in fact the first Syrian world boxing champion. Although born in Birmingham, Alabama, Sarron was proud of his Syrian heritage, a fact underlined by Time magazine, which reported his title winning effort against Miller. Many, myself included, had assumed Mustafa Hamsho was the only Syrian ever who was even close to becoming a world boxing Champion. Ironically, so far the International Boxing Hall of Fame has also seemingly forgotten Sarron, even as they have Miller, the guy Sarron took the title from, already enshrined. Sarron later became a referee, and he passed away July 3, 1994. Royalty, religious leaders, and superstars may be remembered by mass audiences, but we choose to remember those who put their body at risk for our general entertainment, often men and women who unjustifiably leave the sport and entertainment business into the darkness of a night that will never change into day again. Because of that, today we remember Petey Sarron, a warrior the sport of boxing should feel proud of.
    1 Points
  31. scribbs

    Petey Sarron

    What a night! What a fight! by Ron Jackson 07/12/2009, 21:18 Of all the superb fights that took place on SA soil during the past decades, few came close to matching the first world title bout held in South Africa. The history-making contest was between two Americans, Petey Sarron and Freddie Miller, who met in Johannesburg on September 4, 1937; a cold spring night. Sarron retained his featherweight title by beating Miller over 12 action-packed rounds at the old Wanderers ground near the Johannesburg Park Station. Sarron had taken the crown from Miller in a bruising encounter over 15 rounds in Washington on May 11 the previous year. Before losing the title, Miller had beaten Sarron in a title fight. They then fought twice at the Wanders; first in a non-title fight over ten rounds on July 31, 1937, with Miller a clear winner. Sarron had undertaken to give Miller a title fight in the event of Miller beating him and, true to his word, Sarron staked his title against Miller within five weeks. The two Americans genuinely disliked each other and a sell-out crowd of 20 000 paid what was then a SA record of ten thousand pounds to watch them fight. South African Willie Corner had refereed the non-title bout but Sarron pressed for a change and Tiny St John Dean, secretary of the Transvaal National Sporting Club, was appointed to handle the rematch. It was reported that he told the fighters before they shook hands, “There are no instructions; you know the rules; fight!” Some spectators had hot-water bottles and rugs to keep warm, but the action in the ring was red hot. In the build-up to the fight, local newspapers reported in detail how the boxers prepared. The Sunday Express announced that the winner would be presented with a gold belt. Sarron fought a much more tactical fight this time and was slightly ahead after the first five rounds. He then dropped the southpaw Miller for a count of seven in the sixth with a right hook. Miller recovered fairly quickly and came back at the champion, even throwing punches after the bell. But he was cut near one of his eyes in the eleventh round and went down again in the twelfth. Sarron was a clear winner but some spectators jeered the decision. However, they stopped when Miller indicated that Sarron was the winner. Only six days later, Sarron went to Cape Town and outpointed Teddy Braun over ten rounds in a non-title fight. There were rumours that the return bout for the world title was not on the level, and that Miller received the lion’s share of the purse, even though he lost. If the fight was not strictly above board, no one would have guessed it. Sarron had already received a substantial offer of six thousand pounds to defend his title against Henry Armstrong in New York. They duly fought at Madison Square Garden on October 29, 1937 and in a savage battle Armstrong stopped Sarron in the sixth round. It was the first time Sarron had ever been floored, let alone knocked out.
    1 Points
  32. scribbs

    Joe Gans

    There are 2 books about the first Afro-American fighter to win a world title. Aycock & Scott brought out a biography & The Longest Fight by William Gildea The Longest Fight : NPR Welcome To The Glory Days of Boxing ***** Joe Gans: The Timeless Master By Mike Casey The Old Master: Analyzing The Subtle Sophistication Of Joe Gans ***** Monte Cox the historian has done some good articles Joe Gans, The Old Master....“He Could Lick Them All On Their Best Day!” Research Articles Joe Gans, The Old Master: Was He The Greatest of Alltime? Joe Gans Championship Years: Setting the Record Straight Joe Gans vs. Roberto Duran- What IF by Sam Gregory - Joe Gans versus Roberto Duran Goldfield's Golden Battle: 100 Year Anniversary of Gans-Nelson 1 - Goldfield's Golden Battle ***** A century after his death, boxer Joe Gans finally getting his due - Baltimore Sun ***** Babe Herman Fight Video Terry McGovern Fight Video ***** CBZ Record Boxrec Record ***** Some newspaper write up's of selected fights from an excellent blog Senya13: 1898-12-27 Joe Gans W-PTS25 Wilmington Jack Daly [Lenox Athletic Club, New York, NY, USA] Senya13: 1900-04-02 Joe Gans W-TKO5 Chicago Jack Daly [Penn Art Club, Philadelphia, PA, USA] Senya13: 1904-03-28 Joe Gans W-PTS10 Gus Gardner (Saginaw, MI, USA) Senya13: 1904-04-21 Joe Gans W-PTS15 Sam Bolen (Baltimore, MD, USA) Senya13: 1904-06-13 Joe Gans W-TKO4 Sammy Smith (Philadelphia, PA, USA) Senya13: 1906-01-19 Joe Gans W-KO15 Mike 'Twin' Sullivan [Hayes Valley Athletic Club, Woodward's Pavilion, San Francisco, CA, USA]
    1 Points
  33. BrockLee

    Ronda Rousey - not striking coach??

    She just want fame she is not a skillful fighter
    0 Points
  34. boxingworld

    Klitschko v.s Ward

    who won this fight??
    0 Points
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