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Found 4 results

  1. Religions and Traditions

    A huge amount of human beings, who are curious to start and practice the Martial Art and especially Wing Chun are probably wondering: Is Wing Chun somehow connected to one kind of religion? Actually, a lot of trainees, who are practicing Wing Chun, look at their training as one kind of religious work or ethic, spiritual and moral pursuit. There is and always has been that undeniable question whether there in fact is some kind of connection and similarity between all sorts of Chinese Military Art (Wing Chun in the first place), and religion or at least between Wing Chun and the spiritual aspect of person’s life. It is noted that the main and the key idea why “Wing Chun habit” developed through some direct moves or chain of tete-a-tete movements is that there is one function of Wing Chun that is in fact a kind of holy religion for all those people, who are practicing it. It has been shown in many places how Wing Chun has affected the religious and spiritual lives of their practitioners on more than a rhetorical level. Source: http://gowingchun.com/category/religions-and-traditions
  2. Bruce Lee: The silent flute

    In the habit of making predictions about his future, Bruce Lee said that he would make kung fu known throughout the world, but he also knew beyond any doubt that the only way he could do this was by making films. Though he had allies, the fact that they agreed that he had all the qualities needed but could find no outlet for them only made things worse. In addition, Bruce also had the same directness in the film world that he had with the martial arts fraternity: he always said exactly what he thought. Sadly this didn’t win him many new friends in an industry whose wheels run smoother when oiled by bullshit. Nobody knew quite what to do with him, and more to the point, nobody was willing to risk money on an unknown actor who also happened to be Chinese. More than once it must have made Bruce question why he’d fought against his own countrymen for the right to teach kung fu to Westerners. Source: http://gowingchun.com/bruce-lee-the-silent-flute.html
  3. Bruce Lee made a powerful impression on one of the students of Garfield High School, where he was an occasional guest lecturer. He arrived one day, looking cool with Amy Sanbo on his arm, to give a talk on Chinese philosophy. He didn’t even notice Linda Emery, an athletic girl of seventeen, but she was taken enough to ask the girl beside her who he was. Her friend, a Chinese-American girl named Sue Ann Kay, replied that Bruce was the guy who was teaching her kung fu. During one busy evening training session Taky took a call from James Lee in Oakland. Allen Joe had given an impressive report on Bruce and James now asked if Bruce would like to come down to Oakland and teach a few classes. A week or so later Bruce set off. He had difficulty reading the American roadmaps he wondered if his 20/400 vision might be getting even worse and would occasionally get lost on the coast road, but after nearly sixteen hours and 810 miles, the ‘police car’ arrived in Oakland. Source: http://gowingchun.com/bruce-lee-years-of-garfield-high-school.html
  4. A year after beginning kung fu Bruce Lee took up dancing the cha-cha, mainly because of his interest in his partner Pearl Cho, although it also served to develop his balance and footwork. Unable to do anything by halves, Bruce kept a list of over a hundred different dance steps on a card in his wallet. Along with fellow wing chun student Victor Kan, Bruce spent many evenings at the Champagne nightclub at Tsimshatsui, where they went to dance and admire the talents of the resident singer Miss Fong Yat Wah. A sharp dresser, Bruce insisted on ironing his own clothes. As he left the apartment each evening, he paused for a moment in front of the mirror to check his hair and flash the confident smile that never failed to charm the girls.