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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/02/13 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    As Conor McGregor prepares for the biggest fight of his life just one month away as he faces Floyd Mayweather in a boxing match on Aug. 26 in Las Vegas, he’s moved his camp to Las Vegas where he’s been working with several new training partners. Retired boxing champion and Showtime color commentator Paulie Malignaggi joined the ranks of McGregor’s team last week when he showed up to offer the UFC champion some sparring rounds after a critical assessment of his chances to beat Mayweather in a boxing match. http://www.mmaweekly.com/paulie-malignaggi-critical-of-conor-mcgregors-knockout-power-for-boxing
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    Good read. I myself think power and chins we all posses. But to me it is the timing of the punch landed, and also the timing of the punch received that produces the desired effects.
  6. 3 points
    1. Changed shout box height for you shout masters to have more room. 2. Changed the "Like button" option, to rep points buttons positive and or negative 3. Added new smilies
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  8. 2 points
    Weak... The attitude anyway. I saw him (Davis) on Instagram talking about the people he thought were with him turning their backs ... To lose a belt and potentially be fined over 2lbs is big shit. Making weight is HARD sometimes..esp if it's not a weight you can easily maintain but at this level.. I expect guys to make weight by the time they step on the scale. smh Hmm.... lol
  9. 2 points
    This fight is happening tonight. A lot of haters or people talking smack about it... but I will take this over the Maygregor circus any day. I have never heard of Adler ... 16-0 most of her fights in Germany. Shields has the resume, international experience and technique to stay on top until the talent pool grows. Until then I am eager to see if she will steamroll over this girl like all the rest.
  10. 2 points
    after watching english football, i noticed that the english call everyone boy, regardless of race. they call ronaldo boy, rooney boy, vidic boy. "that boy made a great tackle" "that boy scored a beautiful goal". only in the u.s. is it considered racist. mcgregor isn't.
  11. 2 points
    I have to agree on that Floyd makes more money out of this fight than he does by facing anyone else as does Connor
  12. 2 points
    Fucking hell your hard to please he is a novice in the pro ranks the hand speed and the power geneerated was exceptional, he destroyed him!
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    Lets ignore that he uinfied two of the belts eh also beating Pascal, Abraham, Kessler, Jermaine Taylor and Lucian Bute to name a few....his record and level of opponent at least suggest he is worthy of consideration; he was in a division full of quality and was able to comfortably make weight so why would he go up??
  17. 2 points
    Sounds as if he had been a little apologetic over it, the judge would have been a little easier on him!
  18. 2 points
    maybe having title fights before a main event or sandwiched between 2 title fights on a card might help. mixed cards are the only way i see it gaining ground.
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    marathons and the 100 meter dash are both running sports yet they are NEVER compared. you ever heard anyone talk about Usain bolt when talking about kenyan marathoners? me, either.
  22. 2 points
    well, if you're the best in ju jitsu, don't have public workouts showing off your boxing skills because guys like mexfighter will tear your ass apart every chance he gets. you don't see martin "el gallito" castillo doing ju jitsu moves at public workouts, do you?
  23. 2 points
    I saw this new doc on Vimeo. This guy showed loyalty to his country and payed a price for sure. I wondered who this fighter was..... and then I see him fighting a baby Amir Khan
  24. 2 points
    I guess I can look forward to plenty of positive reps then
  25. 2 points
    The Boxing Biographies Newsletter Volume 9 – No 1 18 April , 2013 www.boxingbiographies.com If you wish to sign up for the newsletters ( which includes the images ) please email the message “NEWS LETTER†robert.snell1@ntlworld.com To download the PDF file http://www.keepandshare.com/doc/6188036/boxing-biographies-newsletter-vol-9-no-1-pdf-1-0-meg?da=y Contents summary Moorhead Daily News 23 August 1930 http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/robertsnell/edgren-1930-08-23.jpg ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHT LOOMS AS TOUGH BOXER TO TROUNCE By ROBERT EDGREN Jack Berg, the sensational English lightweight who gave Kid Chocolate of Cuba his first ring trimming, should be a dangerous opponent for Al Singer, new lightweight champion. There isn't any doubt in the world that Berg will give Singer a fight, and it's no secret that Singer isn't at his best against a fast man who never stops hitting. Singer lost to Kid Chocolate in 12 rounds last August. And Ignacio Fernandez, who crowded the present king of all the lightweights, viciously enraged by being struck low, knocked Singer out in three rounds three months before that. No doubt Singer has improved a lot in the past year, and has the confidence that comes to any man who knocks out a champion, but that doesn't prove he can beat the British whirlwind. Singer looked like Terry McGovern in the quick knockout of Mandell, but he isn’t always such a punching wonder. Eight of his fights last year, aside from the one he lost to Kid Chocolate, went 10 rounds to a decision. Moorhead Daily News 11 April 1931 http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/robertsnell/edgren-1931-04-11.jpg Jack Dempsey said he'd never fight again, and a few days later stood right up in a Chicago court and offered to fight Harry Wills "any time the promoters put up that million dollars they offered." Well, you couldn't blame Dempsey for changing his mind if there's that much profit in it. Jack Dempsey never could be the iron fisted ring tiger he was when he battered the gigantic Willard into a helpless hulk. But he could be a very good fighter if he wanted to come back, even now. Dempsey is only a year older than Bob Fitzsimmons was when Bob knocked out Jim Corbett for the world's championship. He is four years younger than Fitzsimmons was when he put up the greatest fight of his life, battering the greatest heavyweight champion of them all, , Jim Jeffries, to a bleeding pulp in that San Francisco ring, smashing both hands in the vain effort to crush big' Jeff down, and being knocked out himself only when both hands were gone. Moorhead Daily News 18 April 1931 http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/robertsnell/edgren-1931-04-18.jpg There has been a lot of talk about the "slump" in boxing and much theorizing about what can possibly be wrong with the good old game that made popular world heroes of such characters as John L. Sullivan, Bob Fitzsimons, Jim Corbett, Jim Jeffries, Jack Dempsey, Joe Gans, Terry McGovern, etc., etc. One of boxing's troubles was over promotion. A good fighter might be worth what Jeffries and Corbett drew at the gate back in 1903, which was a modest $63,340. But it is impossible to think that a "championship contest" of only 10 rounds can by any miracle be worth $2,658,660, same being the amount paid in at the ticket offices when Dempsey and Tunney had their return match in Chicago. The first was a championship match, at a 20 round distance, and the men earned what they got when the winner's and loser's end together amounted to $43,68. Compare that to the $990,445.54 Tunney got at Chicago, and get a laugh. Moorhead Daily News 16 July 1931 http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/robertsnell/edgren-1931-07-06.jpg In one of the most sensational finishes seen in a heavyweight championship fight in many years. Max Schmeling knocked out Young Stribling in the 15th round, with less than 20 seconds to go. From the beginning of the sixth round, when Joe Jacobs sent Max out with the warning: "You've got to fight—it looks bad," It was Schmeling's fight all the way except in spots here and there. In the mere matter of landing blows Stribling scored well enough, but his hardest and most perfectly placed smashes on chin and body had no effect at all on the man of iron from Germany. Nothing seemed to hurt Max. He was hit by enough to knock out a dozen ordinary men, and his knees never shook. He was socked on the point of the chin with vicious uppercuts, and he grinned. The grin increased as the fight went on. Mick Hill has recently produced a worthy book on the English Prize Ring. For those of you that don't know Mick, he has long held an interest in boxing, and in particular, the days of bare-knuckle fighting. Mick has produced a 200-page book on the prominent boxers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and he has ensured that many of the lesser-known names of this period are included, in the form of mini-biographies. There are nearly 80 pugilists featured within the book and some of them will be new to even the most fervent follower of boxing during the bare-knuckle age. Two of the first three names included within the book, for instance, are Tom Pipes and Bill Gretting, and it is a welcome change to see the stories of men such as these recorded. As well as producing a page on each boxer which describes their achievements Mick has also taken the trouble to produce their fighting record and virtually all of them also have an illustration. Another welcome addition is the inclusion of the nickname, and so many of these boxers were well-known by their nickname. As an example, the exploits of Jeremy Massey aka "The Stunted Lifeguardsman" can be followed on page 184 and, as well as the biographical details relating to his career, which are spread across two pages, one call also see full details of his fight record. 18 contests are listed for the period between 1842 and 1856 and one will find that Massey was once proclaimed the "Best in the land at Featherweight". It is a nice little book and would be a welcome addition to the bookshelves of a boxing bibliophile. The price is £13.99. To purchase a copy please order from www.fastprint.net/bookshop or Amazon. On Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Famous-Pugilists-English-Prize-Ri/dp/178035505X/ref=sr_1_25?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365594385&sr=1-25&keywords=bareknuckle+boxing Or to contact Mick direct please email bare-fists45@virginmedia.com